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Independent workplace assessment launched into N.W.T … https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/independent-workplace-assessment-launched-into-nwt-legislature-clerks-office/ar-BB1dM0S1
https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/independent-workplace-assessment-launched-into-nwt-legislature-clerks-office/ar-BB1dM0S1
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<span class=”image” data-attrib=”CBC” data-caption=”Tim Mercer, the clerk for the Northwest Territories Legislative Assembly, denies all allegations against him.” data-id=”106″ data-m=””>
<img alt=”a man wearing a suit and tie: Tim Mercer, the clerk for the Northwest Territories Legislative Assembly, denies all allegations against him.” src=”https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/independent-workplace-assessment-launched-into-nwt-legislature-clerks-office/ar-BB1dM0S1″>
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<span class=”attribution”>© CBC</span>
Tim Mercer, the clerk for the Northwest Territories Legislative Assembly, denies all allegations against him.
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<p>The Northwest Territories Legislative Assembly’s Board of Management announced Wednesday it plans to launch an independent workplace assessment into the&nbsp;clerk’s office.</p> <p>The move comes after Tim Mercer, the clerk of the N.W.T. legislature, went on leave Monday, the same day accusations of workplace bullying came to light.</p> <p>”The Board of Management wants to thank employees of the Legislative Assembly for their continued professionalism and their efforts to ensure all members are supported when the assembly resumes sitting next week,”&nbsp;read&nbsp;a statement from the board on Wednesday.</p> <p>It says it will comment further “when appropriate.”</p> <p>The Board of Management is a committee of MLAs that&nbsp;is responsible for the overall management of the Legislative Assembly.&nbsp;</p> <p>On Monday CBC <a href=”https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/nwt-clerk-accused-of-bullying-staff-1.5913746″ data-id=”108″ data-m=””>published bullying allegations made against Mercer</a> by a worker in his office.</p> <p>April Taylor, a&nbsp;committee advisor, said&nbsp;Mercer has&nbsp;berated her and others to the point of tears. She also said Mercer responds to any criticism with hostility, and that his behaviour has gone unchecked by MLAs for years.</p> <p>Mercer denies all of the allegations. He says most of them were independently investigated two years ago and found to be groundless.</p> <p>MLA Steve Norn made similar allegations against Mercer&nbsp;and called for an independent investigation of him on Monday.</p>

<p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Wed, 17 Feb 2021 15:39:22 +0000 News Reports
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B.C.’s waterfront workers break silence on harassment and … https://theprovince.com/opinion/mike-leonard-b-c-s-waterfront-workers-speak-up-break-silence-on-harassment-and-bullying
https://theprovince.com/opinion/mike-leonard-b-c-s-waterfront-workers-speak-up-break-silence-on-harassment-and-bullying
<header aria-label=”Beginning of Article” class=”article-header” readability=”30.422360248447″> <nav aria-label=”Breadcrumb” class=”breadcrumbs”> <h2 class=”visually-hidden”>Breadcrumb Trail Links</h2> <ol class=”breadcrumbs__items list-unstyled”> <li class=”breadcrumbs__item”> <a class=”breadcrumbs__item-link” href=”https://theprovince.com/category/opinion/”>Opinion</a> </li> <li class=”breadcrumbs__item”> <a aria-current=”page” class=”breadcrumbs__item-link” href=”https://theprovince.com/category/opinion/op-ed/”>Op-Ed</a> </li> </ol> </nav> <p class=”article-subtitle”> Opinion: In the coming months, waterfront workers and managers from Vancouver Island to the Alaska border will be educated and trained to prevent, respond and support those who suffer from violence or harassment. </p> <div class=”article-meta”> <div class=”published-by”> <p>Author of the article:</p> <span class=”published-by__author”>Mike Leonard</span> </div> <div class=”published-date”> <p>Publishing date:</p> <span class=”published-date__since”>Feb 19, 2021</span> &nbsp;•&nbsp; <span class=”updated-date__since”>23&nbsp;hours ago</span> &nbsp;•&nbsp; <span class=”published-date__word-count”>3 minute read</span> </div> </div> <figure class=”featured-image”> <picture class=”featured-image__ratio featured-image-category__opinion”> <source media=”(min-width: 1200px)” type=”image/webp” srcset=”https://smartcdn.prod.postmedia.digital/theprovince/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/png0529nport-04.jpg?quality=90&amp;strip=all&amp;w=564&amp;type=webp, https://smartcdn.prod.postmedia.digital/theprovince/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/png0529nport-04.jpg?quality=90&amp;strip=all&amp;w=1128&amp;type=webp 2x”> <source media=”(min-width: 1200px)” type=”image/jpeg” srcset=”https://smartcdn.prod.postmedia.digital/theprovince/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/png0529nport-04.jpg?quality=90&amp;strip=all&amp;w=564&amp;type=jpg, https://smartcdn.prod.postmedia.digital/theprovince/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/png0529nport-04.jpg?quality=90&amp;strip=all&amp;w=1128&amp;type=jpg 2x”> <source media=”(min-width: 768px)” type=”image/webp” srcset=”https://smartcdn.prod.postmedia.digital/theprovince/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/png0529nport-04.jpg?quality=90&amp;strip=all&amp;w=472&amp;type=webp, https://smartcdn.prod.postmedia.digital/theprovince/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/png0529nport-04.jpg?quality=90&amp;strip=all&amp;w=944&amp;type=webp 2x”> <source media=”(min-width: 768px)” type=”image/jpeg” srcset=”https://smartcdn.prod.postmedia.digital/theprovince/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/png0529nport-04.jpg?quality=90&amp;strip=all&amp;w=472&amp;type=jpg, https://smartcdn.prod.postmedia.digital/theprovince/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/png0529nport-04.jpg?quality=90&amp;strip=all&amp;w=944&amp;type=jpg 2x”> <source media=”(max-width: 767px)” type=”image/webp” srcset=”https://smartcdn.prod.postmedia.digital/theprovince/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/png0529nport-04.jpg?quality=90&amp;strip=all&amp;w=288&amp;type=webp, https://smartcdn.prod.postmedia.digital/theprovince/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/png0529nport-04.jpg?quality=90&amp;strip=all&amp;w=576&amp;type=webp 2x”> <img alt=”VANCOUVER, BC., May 29, 2019 — Business continues at The Port of Vancouver, a key link for Canadian trade with Asia, as it appears to be headed to an almost full shutdown after companies that operate port facilities announced a lockout, in Vancouver, BC., May 29, 2019. The B.C. Maritime Employers Association, which negotiates for the 55 companies that operate port facilities, gave notice Tuesday to the International Longshore and Warehouse Union of Canada, saying that because of a limited longshore strike that began Monday, it would lock out most of the 6,000 longshore workers at 8 a.m. on Thursday. (NICK PROCAYLO/PostMedia) 00057569A ORG XMIT: 00057569A [PNG Merlin Archive]” class=”featured-image__image lazyload” data-src=”https://smartcdn.prod.postmedia.digital/theprovince/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/png0529nport-04.jpg?quality=90&amp;strip=all&amp;w=288″ data-srcset=”https://smartcdn.prod.postmedia.digital/theprovince/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/png0529nport-04.jpg?quality=90&amp;strip=all&amp;w=288,
https://smartcdn.prod.postmedia.digital/theprovince/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/png0529nport-04.jpg?quality=90&amp;strip=all&amp;w=576 2x” height=”750″ loading=”lazy” src=”https://smartcdn.prod.postmedia.digital/theprovince/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/png0529nport-04.jpg?quality=5&amp;strip=all&amp;w=100″ width=”1000″> </picture> <figcaption class=”featured-image__caption image-caption”> <span class=”caption”>The 10,000 women and men who make up B.C.’s waterfront workforce unload ocean carriers, operate cranes, drive heavy lift-trucks and work in administration offices.</span> <span class=”credit”>Photo by NICK PROCAYLO</span> /<span class=”distributor”>PNG</span> </figcaption> </figure> </header> <section class=”article-content__content-group” readability=”54.262924667651″> <h2 class=”visually-hidden”>Article content</h2> <p>If you’re going to work on the waterfront, you better have thick skin.</p> <p>For generations, that was the regular refrain for any newcomer. Over many decades, we forged a reputation as a rough and tumble workplace where bullying and harassment could take place.</p> <p>By any standard, that is completely inappropriate.</p> <p>Fortunately, times have changed. Our society has made enormous strides exposing and removing inappropriate conduct in the workplace. Here in B.C., we have strived to create a more welcoming environment and diverse culture for our waterfront workforce.</p> <p>The 10,000 women and men who make up B.C.’s waterfront workforce are the ones who keep Canadians supplied with the goods they rely on, from medical necessities and food to construction equipment and even our smartphones. In return, those same people support the nation’s economy by ensuring Canadian grain, wood, extracted materials, manufactured goods and so much more reaches world markets. They unload ocean carriers, operate cranes, drive heavy lift-trucks and work in administration offices. Employees and employers, union and management.</p> </section> <div class=”ad__section-border article-content__ad-group”> <section class=”ad”> <h2 class=”visually-hidden”>Advertisement</h2> <div class=”ad__container”> <div class=”ad__label”> <p> Story continues below </p> </div> <div class=”ad__inner” id=”ad__inner-1″ readability=”6.5″> <div class=”ad__placeholder” readability=”8″> <p> This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below. </p> </div> </div> </div> </section> </div> <section class=”article-content__content-group” readability=”65″> <h2 class=”visually-hidden”>Article content</h2> <p>Our focus has always been on getting the job done safely and quickly. While it is hard to admit, we haven’t always been as focused on how people treat each other along the way.</p> <p>Yes, it’s true we have made significant gains in recent years when it comes to physical safety, but much more can be done, and we need to focus on the behaviour that has created the culture we are seeking to change. We know our workplaces can reach their full potential when everyone feels welcome and valued.</p> <p>Last week, we took a giant leap forward in that effort as we joined the federal government in launching a $7-million training initiative aimed at preventing workplace violence and harassment. The B.C. Maritime Employers Association is working in partnership with the International Longshore and Warehouse Union Canada Longshore Division with training support from the Ending Violence Association of B.C. to create a safer, more respectful and inclusive workplace.</p> <p>This ground-breaking program is the first of its kind on the B.C. waterfront and is one of the most comprehensive workplace violence and harassment programs ever undertaken in the federal sector. It is part of a Government of Canada initiative to shift workplace culture, ensuring everyone can work in a healthy, safe and respectful environment.</p> <p>Bullying, harassment and violence hide in the shadows of many Canadian workplaces. We, in the maritime sector, are choosing to shine a light on those injustices. Guided by the incredible leaders at the Ending Violence Association of B.C., based on their award-winning Be More Than a Bystander program, the education and training program will focus on preventing violence and harassment as well as bullying, racism and discrimination, with an emphasis on people at highest risk, including women, LGBTQ2+ and Indigenous communities.</p> </section> <div class=”ad__section-border article-content__ad-group”> <section class=”ad”> <h2 class=”visually-hidden”>Advertisement</h2> <div class=”ad__container”> <div class=”ad__label”> <p> Story continues below </p> </div> <div class=”ad__inner” id=”ad__inner-2″ readability=”6.5″> <div class=”ad__placeholder” readability=”8″> <p> This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below. </p> </div> </div> </div> </section> </div> <section class=”article-content__content-group” readability=”65″> <h2 class=”visually-hidden”>Article content</h2> <p>In the coming months, waterfront workers and managers from Vancouver Island to the Alaska border will be educated and trained to prevent, respond and support those who suffer from violence or harassment. This is backed up by robust compliance-based policies and procedures outlined in new amendments to the Canada Labour Code, which came into effect on Jan. 1.</p> <p>The goal is prevention, but if you experience inappropriate conduct — or witness it — you have an obligation to act. We’re not asking waterfront workers to be superheroes, we’re asking that they “be more than a bystander” and become agents of change. All waterfront employers now have robust confidential procedures in place to receive, investigate and resolve complaints while protecting the privacy of the complainant.</p> <p>Throughout the development of this training, one of EVA-BC’s lead trainers, former B.C. Lion and Grey Cup champion J.R. Larose has truly inspired me. His energy and passion for this cause is infectious. His favourite quote from Martin Luther King Jr. has become our mantra: “In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.”</p> <p>We are breaking the silence. We are speaking up. No longer can we be a bystander to inappropriate conduct in the workplace.</p> <p>Together, we can and must effect positive change in workplaces across coastal British Columbia. It is good for workers, unions, employers and Canada’s economy.</p> <p>Waterfront workers deserve it. Canadians expect it.</p> <p><em>Mike Leonard is the president and CEO of the B.C. Maritime Employers Association, providing advisory services in human resources to 53 waterfront employers across the province.</em></p> </section> <section class=”article-content__share-group article-delimiter” data-evt=”beforeunload” data-evt-typ=”scroll-depth” data-evt-val=”}”> <h2 class=”visually-hidden”>Share this article in your social network</h2> </section> <div class=”widget article-content__widget-group article-content__widget-group–slot1″> <section aria-labelledby=”TheProvinceHeadlineNews9200079102746747824875519176126242″ class=”newsletter-widget” data-account-id=”b9d3df2fccd108b5eff3c44f573b2cd6″ data-target-list=”TP_HeadlineNews” data-widget=”newsletter” readability=”-22.5″> <div class=”newsletter-widget__body” readability=”12″> <h2 id=”TheProvinceHeadlineNews9200079102746747824875519176126242″>The Province Headline News</h2> <p class=”newsletter-widget__text”>Sign up to receive daily headline news from The Province, a division of Postmedia Network Inc.</p> <div aria-hidden=”false” class=”newsletter-widget__bottom js-form-main”> <small> By clicking on the sign up button you consent to receive the above newsletter from Postmedia Network Inc. 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Thu, 18 Feb 2021 18:05:00 +0000 News Reports
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Workplace Harassment: More Common Than You May Think … https://ryortho.com/breaking/workplace-harassment-more-common-than-you-may-think/
https://ryortho.com/breaking/workplace-harassment-more-common-than-you-may-think/
<p>A new survey has found that sexism and bullying are alive and kicking in orthopedics.</p><p>“Oh, the ‘isms’ just won’t go away,” some think. “Sexism, racism, etc…how many people can I be expected to care about?”</p><p>Indeed, while some may tire of hearing about the suffering of another, i.e., compassion fatigue, that doesn’t make the underlying problem any less real.</p><p>But to rectify the situation one must have data.</p><p>No problem, say a group of multicenter researchers, whose work, “<a href=”https://journals.lww.com/jaaos/Fulltext/2020/12150/Harassment,_Discrimination,_and_Bullying_in.10.aspx” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>Harassment, Discrimination, and Bullying in Orthopaedics: A Work Environment and Culture Survey</a>,” was published in the December 15, 2020 edition of the <em>Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons</em>.</p><p>Co-author Kristy Weber, M.D., vice-chair of Faculty Affairs, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Penn Medicine and past president of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), explained the context surrounding the study to <em>OTW</em>, “While we have substantial data about discrimination and harassment in general, there are not much data on these issues in orthopaedics.”</p><p>Co-author Julie Samora, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., associate medical director for Quality and the director of Orthopaedic Quality Improvement at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, added, “In 2021 you would hope that when an orthopedic surgeon goes to work in the morning, she would have zero chance of encountering any type of harassment, discrimination, or bullying. But our data indicate that we are not there yet.”</p><p>And this is not limited to only the United States, says Dr. Samora. Their work, in fact, was modeled after a Royal Australasian College of Surgeons survey which found that an alarming number of female trainees had been propositioned for sex, subjected to repeated physical advances, or experienced other types of bullying and harassment.</p><p>Using a survey created by the AAOS, the researchers set out to assess workplace safety and overall workplace culture in the United States. Women and underrepresented minority AAOS members and an equal number of randomly selected male non-underrepresented minority members were invited to complete the survey.</p><p>Dr. Samora summarized the results from this highly selected group within AAOS, “We had <strong>927</strong> members respond to the survey, with 66% indicating that they have experienced some form of harassment, discrimination, or bullying behavior. Specifically, 79% had experienced discrimination, 55% had been bullied, 47% had been sexually harassed, and 40% had experienced general harassment. Although women were more likely than men to have experienced these behaviors (81% vs 35%), men still were targets of discrimination, bullying and harassment. Only 58% of respondents reported that their workplaces were equipped to deal effectively with these behaviors.”</p><p><span><em><span><strong>Hazing</strong></span></em></span></p><p>“It seems as part of the surgical culture during training, it is not uncommon to be degraded or humiliated by attendings, co-residents, or even staff. Trainees can be made to appear ill-informed or irresponsible and are expected to simply take these incidents in stride, keep their heads down, and keep quiet.”</p><p>“We are just scratching the surface of harassment, discrimination and bullying data in medicine,” she adds. “The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine has recently done a good job in highlighting the prevalence of sexual harassment in the STEM [science, technology, engineering, and mathematics] fields, and these types of behaviors in the UK have recently been underscored.”</p><p><span><em><span><strong>“Oh, I thought you were a nurse.”</strong></span></em></span></p><p>When <em>OTW</em> asked Dr. Samora about gender based bias in orthopedics, she pointed out that both explicit and implicit bias exist in the work environment. “Recent data have shown that women commonly experience microaggressions in the orthopedic training and work environment. There are certainly biases (many implicit) that affect the training and work environment for women, which many male counterparts are often not attuned to. For example, women in medicine experience verbal and nonverbal reminders of how they differ from the traditional image of the white male physician, often being mistaken for a nurse or a patient care assistant, with many patients being ‘surprised’ that a woman could be a surgeon.”</p><p>Dr. Weber also addressed the issue of gender based bias saying, “I imagine men find it hard to understand what it’s like to be the primary caregiver at home in most cases. Women surgeons do the same work at work and more work at home. Given the disparity in numbers, the men are often not around women to even understand this and might consider it a ‘one off’ when they see a woman in the field.”</p><p><span><em><span><strong>I just want to treat my patients!</strong></span></em></span></p><p>“Unfortunately,” states Dr. Samora, “these microaggressions stem from family members and patients as often as they do from male surgeons and female staff. The difficulty of experiencing these repeated microaggressions over time is that they can lead to undermining of relationships, compromised quality of care, lower self-esteem, anxiety, and even depression.”</p><p>“They can also lead to women leaving the surgical workplace over time”, says Dr. Weber.</p><p><span><em><span><strong>Clear rules needed.</strong></span></em></span></p><p>Dr. Samora states: “The most successful strategy is to have an institution that supports diversity, equity, and inclusion and that has a no tolerance policy for these types of behaviors. I would encourage faculty and staff to undergo implicit bias training, in addition to cultural sensitivity training. The more diverse the environment, the less these types of behaviors occur. Wherever we are on the hierarchy, we need to feel comfortable speaking out, whether we are bystanders, or targets of these behaviors. There need to be adequate reporting mechanisms, clear policies for accountability, and a safety mechanism to protect the target (reporter) from retribution.”</p><p>And that target can be a male.</p><p>“We were surprised to find that women and men have experienced these behaviors,” says Dr. Samora. “Clearly, no one is immune to the problem.”</p><p>“Culture change starts at the top of any organization whether it be an academic institution, a large multi-specialty practice, or a national orthopaedic organization. Leaders need to demonstrate the core values of equity and inclusion and model this behavior in all workplace interactions,” says Dr. Weber.</p><p><span><em><span><strong>Hope on the horizon.</strong></span></em></span></p><p>Dr. Weber: “The AAOS has a 5-year strategy for diversity as part of our overall strategic plan. It is detailed with accountability and deliverables via our Diversity Advisory Board Repeating this survey over time is part of that plan.”</p><p>“Harassment and discrimination are first and foremost local as they occur in the workplace, so the work has to occur there…and I doubt a Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion task force or committee will be effective in name only. They must have access to data, availability of resources, and the power to make changes for committees to be truly effective.”</p><p><span><em><span><strong>On paper versus reality.</strong></span></em></span></p><p>“The AAOS Board has outlined new core values that touch on inclusion and equity. Having core values and actually living into them with corresponding behaviors are two different things so we have considerable work to do.”</p><p>“Organizations such as the AAOS, the American Orthopaedic Association, and specialty societies can all do their part to have a no tolerance policy for harassment. From a discrimination/bias standpoint, we need to address this by removing structural barriers in institutions and national organizations. One example of a structural change for national orthopaedic organizations is to focus on the governance processes by which leaders are selected. Focusing on objective competencies such as strategic thinking and leadership rather than the all-too-common political cronyism will help decrease bias and keep organizations relevant to younger, diverse members. We also need to do the hard 1:1 work, essentially laying the groundwork via individual interactions.”</p><p>Dr. Weber: “The problem is real, and the culture and behavior need to change.”</p><p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Thu, 18 Feb 2021 09:27:00 +0000 News Reports
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